Making the World Safe for Autocracy

Tearing down the country.

(Picture courtesy of nerdnirvana.org.)

The strengths and advantages of democracy are looking ever more bleak.  The shining cities on a hill image that we used to project is smeared pretty badly by the picture of two sides fighting over the success, but risking the failure, of a country that officials vowed to serve.  While I don’t subscribe to the theory that both sides are at fault, as the uglies on the right are able to make political gains by spouting unmitigated lies like the birther/death panel sort, I do see that from the other side of political systems the failure of democracy must be looking pretty well here and now.

China is a particular success and has an economy solidly directed to the upside, while achieving great leaps forward (sorry, Mao tse-Tsung) in alternate energy and economies of production.   Taking one more dig at the spectacle, most nations of the earth far out-achieve the U.S. in education and health care, most also in environmental conservation and infrastructure.

It appears that our rampant Boss Hogg Koch and Evita Bachmann element have achieved what the communist dictators would have given much to see, a U.S. that is locked in internal combat that one side will fight right over the edge of disaster while the former enemies applaud as we plunge from former greatness.

Watching the administration struggle with unremitting hostilities from the irresponsible recidivists makes the opponents of democratic success daily stronger.

We watch in horror from the side of self-preservation as the U.S. daily shows greater fragility in the face of domestic terrorists.  Will the right wing push the country the rest of the way over the precipice?   Hard to say.

The effects of refusing to increase debt limits is the next looming chance to throw the country off the cliff.   This has been announced for those who so far have failed to learn from history, as a matter of keeping the U.S. financially in good standing in the world by standing behind our own good word.   If the country doesn’t make good on our commitments, we are those bad debtors that the wingnuts have claimed were responsible for the recession.   Claims have been pushed all along from the right, that we lefties were buying homes we couldn’t afford under goading from the liberal politicians – liberals too interested in the financial equality they now hope forever to cut away from our national achievements.  One warning came in January, now they’re closer to the verge of total failure of the U.S. economy.

The government will reach the limit between March 31 and May 16, Geithner said in a letter to congressional leaders. Not increasing the $14.3 trillion debt limit could lead to job losses, he said. Inaction could drive up interest rates and make it more costly for U.S. companies to borrow money.

Geithner’s warning is directed chiefly at Republicans, who are vowing to block an increase in the debt limit and use the fight to restrain government spending.

House Speaker John Boehner said spending cuts and reforming a broken budget process must come first. Those are the top priorities for the new Republican majority in the House.

“While America cannot default on its debt, we also cannot continue to borrow recklessly, dig ourselves deeper into this hole and mortgage the future of our children and grandchildren,” Boehner, an Ohio Republican, said in a statement.

With this battle of the titans matched against the rabble, we are a spectacle only an enemy can enjoy.   The U.S. could finally lose its position as the best investment environment for world funds, and see the debts we reject called in.

When loans are taken out, the lender has an option to call the debt, and demand payment, when the debtor shows instability or irresponsible management of that debt.

The prospects of total failure seem only to whet the appetites of the right for more ways to throw what’s left of our economy into the laps of their sponsors.   Sadly, that would be destruction for the sponsors as well, but they haven’t the good sense to see it.

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