How Fragile We Are

So many lives lost.

So many dreams shattered.

So many families with empty arms.

So many loved ones with aching hearts.

Still.

How fragile we all are.  How much stronger we all are together.

In memoriam. Requiescant in pace.


 
98 Responses to "How Fragile We Are"
Christy Hardin Smith | Friday September 11, 2009 05:14 am 1

Morning all. It’s a gray day here, which fits my mood this morning. How are things with all of you?


SanderO | Friday September 11, 2009 06:02 am 2

What a sad memory this day brings.

And still we don’t know the whole story of how these people were killed.


JimWhite | Friday September 11, 2009 06:04 am 3

Thanks, Christy. My sadness centers around how far from peace our reaction to this attack has been. Peace still remains elusive but is worth pursuing.


Christy Hardin Smith | Friday September 11, 2009 06:06 am 4
In response to JimWhite @ 3

There are so many forks in the road that weren’t taken along the way, aren’t there? Intriguing op-ed by two retired Generals on Cheney’s torture tour in the media catching my eye at the moment…


twolf1 | Friday September 11, 2009 06:06 am 5

MSNBC has been replaying their live broadcast from 9-11.


demi | Friday September 11, 2009 06:07 am 6

This day triggers so many awful memories for me. Not only nationally related ones, but very personal ones too. The man I was married to reacted by saying that we should get a gun and move to Bakersfied. That comment triggered a huge fight and he called me at work the next day to say he wasn’t coming home, ever. Big, ugly divorce. Broken hearted kids. Had to sell my house. The For Sale sign went on the lawn the day the Iraq war started. Took a Real Long Time to get back on the train, but I have and I’m glad. This site has been great for me, and I thank all y’all.
Whew. Eight long years.


Christy Hardin Smith | Friday September 11, 2009 06:09 am 7
In response to demi @ 6

Oh demi — how awful for you. Hugs, hon.


RevBev | Friday September 11, 2009 06:10 am 8
In response to demi @ 6

Demi…what a story? Is it time to say good riddance. I trust the trip has made you stronger & wiser, my dear.


Badwater | Friday September 11, 2009 06:11 am 9

So far, there are no new messages from bin Laden, but there’s no longer a bin Laden family crony in the WH.


JimWhite | Friday September 11, 2009 06:13 am 10
In response to demi @ 6

(((demi)))


Badwater | Friday September 11, 2009 06:14 am 11
In response to demi @ 6

Long ago, I lived in Bakersfield for a year. At least you didn’t have to do that.


Christy Hardin Smith | Friday September 11, 2009 06:14 am 12
In response to twolf1 @ 5

I haven’t turned on the tv this morning — have been purposely avoiding any coverage today. Are they doing it as part of the Morning Joe show? Because their banter annoys the crap outta me. *g*


eCAHNomics | Friday September 11, 2009 06:15 am 13
In response to demi @ 6

Wow. What a tragic story. Glad to see you’re getting back. Sounds like it was past due to confront your ex, and that 9/11 just revealed it.

I was in Manahattan on 9/11. I found in the intervening years that non-Manhattanites were more angry and more scared than people who are actually at risk. For example, I remember sitting at the group table in the ski lodge I stay at, with a man from Minnesota railing against terrorism and how dangerous it was. This occurred probably a year or two after 9/11. I said: But you live in Minnesota. Why are you worried about terrorism? He looked at me as though I were from Mars. I’ve never understood why people responded so overwhelmingly to 9/11, especially those who’s probabilty of being affected was lower than de minimus.


bgrothus | Friday September 11, 2009 06:16 am 14

I saw a piece on Nightline last night about Mr. Entrapment, the guy who “busted” those poor kids in FL for some terrorist idea he put into them. He was an undercover op for the FBI. He wanted to investigate Mr. Atta, but his bosses wanted him to go after some “sure case” he could make on some other low hanging fruit.

He is still upset that they wouldn’t let him investigate Atta, who was suspicious of him, but who he thought had something serious going on.

Could he have intercepted the plot? We will never know for sure. But he surely had them on his radar.


demi | Friday September 11, 2009 06:16 am 15

Because the media was on some sort of potential target list, I worked at Warner Bros. at the time, we had huge security issues. Had to leave for work early, because before entering the studio, each car was searched, trunk, under the car etc. They erected those huge cement barriers around all the buildings. Looked like WWII Germany or something. I’m telling you, Nothing in my life was the same.
I did learn a few lessons about how everything is transitory and eventually, I have a new understanding of the concept of forgiveness. Survival techniques.
Thanks again, all.


twolf1 | Friday September 11, 2009 06:17 am 16

They started the coverage with the moment of silence at 8:46, then went to the footage from 9-11 and are still running it.


oldnslow | Friday September 11, 2009 06:17 am 17

Good morning, Christy and thanks for the post.

Blessedly the morning joke ends at 8:00.


jayt | Friday September 11, 2009 06:18 am 18
In response to SanderO @ 2

And still we don’t know the whole story of how these people were killed.

As it happens, I quite strongly believe the same thing.

I also believe that this is most certainly not the day to be talking about that.


jayt | Friday September 11, 2009 06:18 am 19

{{{{demi}}}}


bgrothus | Friday September 11, 2009 06:20 am 20

Hugs to you, demi.

I agree with you eCHAN. I had friends who had PTSD from being at the towers that morning, but I never felt afraid then or since that we were all at some huge risk.

I’ll tell you, when I stood at the edge of that hole in the spring of 2003, I could hardly believe that those towers fell into their footprints. That is what boggled my mind.


twolf1 | Friday September 11, 2009 06:21 am 21
In response to jayt @ 18

I also believe that this is most certainly not the day to be talking about that.

Thank you.


SouthernDragon | Friday September 11, 2009 06:22 am 22

(((demi)))


eCAHNomics | Friday September 11, 2009 06:22 am 23
In response to bgrothus @ 14

There’s a book, something like The Best Terrorists Money Can Buy, that goes thru all the entrapment, low hanging fruit cases that the FBI has ginned up. There was a segment on antiwar.com with the author. Not sure if the book’s out yet. I had been aware that all these cases were trumped up, but it was interesting to put the all together. The most interesting Q was: Why has the FBI caught no REAL terrorists? The speculative A is that perhaps there aren’t any, because if there were, you’d expect the FBI to stumble on one by accident. I suspect a lot of stuff that may have been going on in the U.S. was rolled up after 9/11.


JimWhite | Friday September 11, 2009 06:22 am 24

Scarecrow’s diary this morning is another good read on the subject at hand.


demi | Friday September 11, 2009 06:22 am 25
In response to eCAHNomics @ 13

You’re not a bee-keeping, tree hugging, moose loving Martian?
I knew perfectly intelligent folks here in LA who were running out to buy plastic sheeting and rolls of duct tape.
For the most part, I am fine and even better now. New mister, new home and more importantly a new understanding about compassion.


eCAHNomics | Friday September 11, 2009 06:24 am 26
In response to bgrothus @ 20

It certainly was mindboggling, and perhaps one of the most audacious events in history.


DiamondMC | Friday September 11, 2009 06:24 am 27

There is not much more to say then, this is a sad day. Not a day for politics, but a day for reflection.


eCAHNomics | Friday September 11, 2009 06:26 am 28
In response to demi @ 25

I am a beekeeper as of this past June, and as for loving moose, a nice rare slab on my place would be loverly.


demi | Friday September 11, 2009 06:27 am 29
In response to twolf1 @ 5

Because of what was going on at home, I missed a lot of the news coverage. Several years ago, on this anniversay, I sat and watched the whole replay. Just wanted to face it. Cried all day.


bgrothus | Friday September 11, 2009 06:27 am 30

I guess we will all remember that day forever. It was a terrible day and a huge tragedy for all, but especially for those who lost loved ones.

Georgie sure knew how to squander the best of what came from that day all over the world.

No matter how Obama disappoints, I am so glad to have him for our president, whenever he opens his mouth. Not only he talk well, but his smile is so easy and genuine.


eCAHNomics | Friday September 11, 2009 06:27 am 31
In response to eCAHNomics @ 28

Make that “plate” not “place.”


Prairie Sunshine | Friday September 11, 2009 06:28 am 32

no N in resquiat…

Sunshine trifecta this cloudy, rainy morning. Recalling vividly standing watching the television coverage and the second plane hitting the world trade center. Calling my son just moved to Chicago for grad school to tell him…and wish him happy birthday. And today is the second-month anniversary of Mr. Sunshine’s passing.

Heading out to find that road less travelled by….


eCAHNomics | Friday September 11, 2009 06:28 am 33

Just flipped to msnbc replay. Can’t watch it. I was glued to it on the day. Can’t do it again.


ghostof911 | Friday September 11, 2009 06:29 am 34
In response to SanderO @ 2

SanderO

Only the wilfully blind do not understand the story of what happened that day.


Christy Hardin Smith | Friday September 11, 2009 06:29 am 35
In response to DiamondMC @ 27

We have so many readers who lost friends and family on 9/11 in NY, PA and DC. And who had friends and family who worked on search and rescue and/or clean-up or construction…and still are.

We also have a lot of folks whose family and friends serve in the military, the diplomatic corps, and in all facets of government service. And who have helped out family members of servicepeople who are serving abroad.

There are so many things we can all do in our own communities to pull together. Each year, I tend to spend a lot of 9/11 thinking about what more I ought to be doing.


demi | Friday September 11, 2009 06:31 am 36
In response to Prairie Sunshine @ 32

(((Prairie Sunshine)))


Christy Hardin Smith | Friday September 11, 2009 06:31 am 37
In response to Prairie Sunshine @ 32

That’s actually the plural, if I remember my parsing correctly…


foothillsmike | Friday September 11, 2009 06:33 am 38

On 9/11 I was on the Rosebud reservation in SD. Was horrified at what was unfolding but my thoughts quickly turned to apprehension for my son who was in special ops. I feared that he would soon be in the big fat middle of it. His unit was in the air over NY and DC that day – in Afghanistan within a couple of weeks.


ghostof911 | Friday September 11, 2009 06:34 am 39
In response to jayt @ 18

Be sure to give us all a ring when it is a proper day to talk about unpleasant topics. We’ll be sitting by the phone for your call.

Refusal to face the reality of what happened plays right into the hands of the perps.


SouthernDragon | Friday September 11, 2009 06:35 am 40
In response to eCAHNomics @ 28

“A slab of moose on my place.” That anything like foothillsmike’s “throw an elk on the grill?” *g*


Frank33 | Friday September 11, 2009 06:35 am 41

Andrea Greenspan, ace reporter, reports at 9:33 am 9-11-01, Bin Laden is the mastermind of the WTC attack!


AZ Matt | Friday September 11, 2009 06:36 am 42
In response to demi @ 6

((((demi))))

Bakerfield, crazy.


Christy Hardin Smith | Friday September 11, 2009 06:36 am 43
In response to foothillsmike @ 38

We’ve had family and friends in and out of Afghanistan and Iraq the last few years as well. It’s as though you never take a full breath until they get back home again — and you worry the whole time how that time will change them and so many others, isn’t it? At least it seems that way for me.

Members of my family and Mr. ReddHedd’s both have always served in the military. So we’ve both been used to family members being deployed in various capacities. But the emotional toll that the constant deployment seems to be taking on so many military families in our area is really tough to see — especially on the families who are left behind here to worry and wait. It’s been really rough on so many of them, especially younger kids.


rxbusa | Friday September 11, 2009 06:37 am 44
In response to JimWhite @ 3

Indeed. And how harmful the response of those in power was to the world. This article about a captured (just in time for 9/11 PR donchaknow) Taliban leader who used to be a house painter in the US makes me think anew how the kneejerk xenophobic response of those in power at the time made the world a much more dangerous place. Setting aside conspiracy theories and the fact that they were warned and it happened anyway, the response was so unthoughtful of the long term consequences.

Sad.


demi | Friday September 11, 2009 06:37 am 45
In response to foothillsmike @ 38

Must have been especially scary for your family too. Our country had been so naive and so sheltered from stark violence before 9/11. That day was a real turning point for us. And, such an opportunity to seek a new global vision, one where we have a more inclusive view. Instead, so many have become more exclusive.


Prairie Sunshine | Friday September 11, 2009 06:38 am 46

aha, a learning moment for moi…


Christy Hardin Smith | Friday September 11, 2009 06:38 am 47
In response to ghostof911 @ 39

Don’t be a jerk, please. For a lot of us — especially those of us who lost friends and family — this isn’t a great day to pick a bickering squabble, thanks.

I’d appreciate it if we left off with this particular line of discussion, because I simply do not have the patience for it this morning. Thank you.


ghostof911 | Friday September 11, 2009 06:38 am 48

Ray McGovern, a 27 year veteran of the CIA who at one point presented the President with his daily briefs, claimed last night that Obama and Leon Panneta are afraid of the CIA. No transcript, need to listen to the audio clip.


rxbusa | Friday September 11, 2009 06:40 am 49
In response to demi @ 6

(((demi)))

glad you survived the ordeal. I’ve learned a lot from you (while lurking myself).


bgrothus | Friday September 11, 2009 06:40 am 50

I’m sure we’ll have a Pug-crazy revival show today. Probably Shooter will find his way to air today to remind us again how unsafe we are because we aren’t going to torture any more.


UnattendedConsequence | Friday September 11, 2009 06:43 am 51

This world of dew
Is a world of dew
And yet… and yet…

Issa


demi | Friday September 11, 2009 06:44 am 52
In response to rxbusa @ 49

Thanks. I sometimes worry that I’m too personal, but I believe that we can all learn from the mistakes of others, because we just don’t have the time or patience to do it all ourselves.
One huge reason I had to survive was the caring and feeding of my youngest son, the Asperger’s kid. He’s now doing really well. He’s in 10th grade and is in the honors biology class. I swear, the kid is going to discover a cure for cancer or aids. I just feel it!


AZ Matt | Friday September 11, 2009 06:44 am 53
In response to foothillsmike @ 38

My boss was special operations too, went off to Afghanistan before the US invasion of the place. He missed 14 months of watching his kids grow up.


rxbusa | Friday September 11, 2009 06:45 am 54
In response to eCAHNomics @ 13

From last thread, I don’t know if you saw my response about Riddley Walker, a post nuclear holocaust novel written in a degraded English. Here’s a link, but I don’t know if I approve of the cover of the new addition…there’s nothing funny about it…it is a very grim parable about war.


AZ Matt | Friday September 11, 2009 06:48 am 55

Currently two nephews are overseas, Kuwait and Afghanistan. Second time in each place for both.


eCAHNomics | Friday September 11, 2009 06:48 am 56
In response to SouthernDragon @ 40

I don’t have an edit button on Christy’s site, so I corrected place to plate in a subsequent comment. Did you see my earlier comment that my hunter friend is gonna bag a moose in VT in October? He’ll share the bounty with me.


eCAHNomics | Friday September 11, 2009 06:50 am 57
In response to rxbusa @ 54

I did pick up your comment, and I also googled RW. Seems a little abstruse for my taste. I’m a pretty plodding, nonfiction, nonsymbolic kind of person. But interesting. Thanks for expanding my information set.


Frank33 | Friday September 11, 2009 06:51 am 58

At 9:59 on 9-11, the South Tower EXPLODES, with most of the building and its contents vaporized, within 11 seconds. At 10:28 North Tower similarly explodes and likewise collapses.


eCAHNomics | Friday September 11, 2009 06:52 am 59
In response to demi @ 52

Great about your son. Some LD kids in my family (my son & more extended), luckily fairly minor, but even minor cases take extraordinary efforts from family, teachers, and the whole village.


Crosstimbers | Friday September 11, 2009 06:53 am 60

I worked in an FAA regional office. I had just gotten off the phone when one of the admin. assistants said that a plane had crashed into the WTC and it was on television in the conference room. I walked down thinking that it must be an accident, like the B-25 that crashed into the Empire State Building shortly after WWII. Just about the time I sat down and started to watch, the second acft flew into the WTC. My mind boggled, but it was immediately obvious that this was no accident.

After watching for while, several of us went to the cafeteria to watch. We were co-located with the FBI, and there were a lot of their agents and supervisors watching intently and making calls. I then suggested to the the people I was with, that we didn’t know how many such aircraft might be still in flight. A short time later, news came about the Pentagon crash. We all went back to our desks, and a little later, someone came around said that all regional staff people were to go home, that the building was being evacuated. My initial feeling was that this was contrary to my military training, leaving your post in time of danger, but it made sense when I thought about federal buildings being a target. I drove home listening to the radio, with occasional small electrical shocks startling my brain.

The major immediate problem for FAA Air Traffic was to get every aircraft, then flying, onto the ground. It had never been done before, and there was no procedure for it or radio phraseology to succinctly express instructions/explanations to pilots . Think about it; landing every aircraft short of their destination, at the nearest airport capable of handling that type aircraft. |I am still proud of the fact that it was done, in short order, with no accidents


tjbs | Friday September 11, 2009 06:58 am 61

Those among the angels that day,by the true definition of a Christian “will willing lay down his life for a stranger”,were 343 heroes who charged the danger when others were running away. Among them the best of the best, Rescue 1, gone. These were the GIANT MEN that stood tall that day. RIP ,well done good and faithful servants.


bgrothus | Friday September 11, 2009 06:58 am 62

demi, we have AS in my family too. After it was diagnosed and we began to understand it, we all took inventories of our various “autistic tendencies.” The various admissions of how our myriad forms of OCD were expressed was quite funny.

But it is a lot of work to help AS children realize their potential, and congrats to you for the good work you have done for your son. It is rewarding of course, but the work never stops.


Christy Hardin Smith | Friday September 11, 2009 06:59 am 63
In response to Crosstimbers @ 60

I have to say, I find it really frightening (although sadly not surprising) that we had no contingency plan to ground aircraft in an emergency.

One of the things I tried to address with the Tom Ridge book salon was how pro-active planning is not something we have been good about doing. That’s abundantly clear as you read through his book and so many others.

It’s been a continuing theme in this country: we deal with things when they reach a crisis point, not calmly and rationally beforehand and proactively. It’s a shame, but it’s how we have seemed to work for ages. You see it not just with emergencies, but also with poverty and child abuse issues and so many more…


TheShadowKnows | Friday September 11, 2009 06:59 am 64

In the name of the innocent victims,

I pause a minute on this eighth annual remembrance of

The 9/11 Bush-Cheney Failure To Protect America

A second day of Infamy caused by the Bush-Cheney inaction towards too many warning signs to enumerate of an impending disaster.


eCAHNomics | Friday September 11, 2009 07:00 am 65
In response to Crosstimbers @ 60

Yes, I hadn’t thought about it, but it was an amazing feat to get all the aircraft on the ground.

I never for a nanosecond thought it was an accident. I was jogging south along the East River, around 60th St. when I saw an amazing cloud of brown-white smoke moving east toward lower Manhattan. Almost instantly thereafter, scores of screaming sirens heading downtown. I got back to my building about 10 minutes later & asked the doorman what was going on. He said a plane hit the WTC. I asked: accident or on purpose? The weather was so gorgeous and clear, it couldn’t possibly have been an accident. Though I had never previously imagined anyone would deliberately crash a plane into a building, and knew nothing about terrorism back then, it was the first thought in my mind.


rxbusa | Friday September 11, 2009 07:00 am 66
In response to eCAHNomics @ 57

I’m more of a fiction reader…truth by analogy works real well for me. That book was on my want-to-read list for a long time when one day my husband and I were driving around Queensland of all places listening to Australian public radio and I heard someone talking about the book. Got home and went to a used bookstore and was ultralucky to find it right off the bat and was embarrassed to see that it had been on my want-to-read list for over 2 decades! Definitely worth the effort with the weird language.


demi | Friday September 11, 2009 07:01 am 67
In response to eCAHNomics @ 59

There’s a jinx here. Yesterday, when I told my sister and she congratulated me, I told her it was all of us loving him, that it takes A Whole Village. A ha!


rxbusa | Friday September 11, 2009 07:02 am 68
In response to demi @ 52

Great news about your son and your hopes for him!


eCAHNomics | Friday September 11, 2009 07:04 am 69
In response to tjbs @ 61

The first responders’ information was less than those of us had who were just watching it on TV. By chance, there was a crew filming a couple of firefighters, doing a documentary of days in the lives of. So they went with them to the command center in the WTC, don’t remember which tower. They didn’t even know when the second plane hit or have enough information to know to evacuate. Talk about being unprepared. It makes me very angry that many of those brave men’s lives were lost needlessly.


eCAHNomics | Friday September 11, 2009 07:05 am 70
In response to rxbusa @ 66

I’ll keep it in mind. Sometimes serendipity happens and a push comes from another source. Sounds like kind of a cult classic.


demi | Friday September 11, 2009 07:07 am 71
In response to tjbs @ 61

Your comment is what “triggered” tears. A nice release. I thank you.


Christy Hardin Smith | Friday September 11, 2009 07:07 am 72
In response to eCAHNomics @ 69

The fact that the communications equipment still isn’t what it needs to be for first responders is appalling. You’d think that 8 years after the fact, that would have been far more of a priority and yet? They are still waiting…


Sufilizard2 | Friday September 11, 2009 07:08 am 73

Well, this is the day I reflect on what could have been in the wake of a national tragedy. We had an opportunity beginning on Sept. 12, 2001. The world was with us, even many countries with which we have not historically gotten along were supportive and sympathetic.

The tragic loss of all that life on 9/11 could have had the silver lining of the world banding together to condemn terrorism in all its forms. The countries of the world could have been rallied to work together in unprecedented ways to increase peace and understanding.

Imagine what the world could be today if we had had any kind of decent, mature response to the tragedy.

Instead we were told to go shopping while our government exploited the tragedy to ram through their ideological wish list and to war profiteer.


Frank33 | Friday September 11, 2009 07:09 am 74

At 10:05 Andrea Mitchell Greenspan links the 1998 Bin Laden African Embassy bombings to the WTC attack. She is America’s greatest reporter, ESP perhaps?


demi | Friday September 11, 2009 07:09 am 75
In response to bgrothus @ 62

True, true and true. Aren’t we all really interesnting individuals? Some whack jobs are just more whack than others. Ha!


Crosstimbers | Friday September 11, 2009 07:12 am 76

There was a long existing plan for wartime grounding of all aircraft, called Security Control of Air Traffic and Navigation Aids (SCATANA). But it involved shutting down all navigational facilities (so that enemy could not use) and after brief advisories, putting aircraft pretty much on their own.

Almost everything the FAA did, up to that point, was based on the primary mission of separating aircraft. Even in the event of a hijacking, the air traffic job was primarily to try to keep other aircraft clear of whatever flight path the hijacked aircraft took. That’s an oversimplification, but was and is essentially the case.


tjbs | Friday September 11, 2009 07:14 am 77
In response to demi @ 71

Written thu tears as a former FF


demi | Friday September 11, 2009 07:15 am 78
In response to Sufilizard2 @ 73

We’ve had many opportunities to be better humans. It’s a long, long, longer than a marathon journey. Well said, Sufi!


Christy Hardin Smith | Friday September 11, 2009 07:16 am 79
In response to Crosstimbers @ 76

Aircraft separation makes a lot of sense — good to know that was part of the thinking. Thanks!


demi | Friday September 11, 2009 07:16 am 80
In response to tjbs @ 77

Big hug to you.
Oh, heck, let’s just do it.
Group Hug.


Christy Hardin Smith | Friday September 11, 2009 07:21 am 81

I’ve got a special edition of Muppet blogging today — on a recent Sesame Street special that deserves wider viewing and discussion.


foothillsmike | Friday September 11, 2009 07:22 am 82

OT Breaking news – per CNN – boat on river in DC challenged coast guard vessels – coast guard vessels fire at ship.


oldgold | Friday September 11, 2009 07:26 am 83

This was a double tragedy. First, of course, was the horroriffic incident itself. The second, was the failure to take advantage of the rare, perhaps once in a lifetime opportunity, for this nation to come together and do great things.


twolf1 | Friday September 11, 2009 07:30 am 84
In response to foothillsmike @ 82

OT Breaking news – per CNN – boat on river in DC challenged coast guard vessels – coast guard vessels fire at ship.

http://seminal.firedoglake.com/diary/8046


Crosstimbers | Friday September 11, 2009 07:33 am 85
In response to oldgold @ 83

My own thought was there was no way a group of 8th Century religious fanatics could bring down the United States, unless our reaction caused us to do it to ourselves. The jury is still out on whether that happened.


foothillsmike | Friday September 11, 2009 07:36 am 86
In response to twolf1 @ 84

It is a training exercise – Incredible stupidity


Crosstimbers | Friday September 11, 2009 07:37 am 87

I’m going to go watch “Which Way Home”, on HBO for a second time. It’s a documentary about children trying to make it from Central America to the U.S., by themselves. It is very moving, though probably not to the likes of Wilson and Tancredo. Anyway, I recommend it.


Blub | Friday September 11, 2009 07:38 am 88
In response to Crosstimbers @ 85

I disagree. I’ve posted here before that I witnessed firsthand what AQ-sponsored groups did on islands in the Mollucas in the late 1990s, where AQ tried to fund a putsch by local militant organizations by coordinating and financing the transfer of thousands of militant taliban-types from madrassahs in Java to attack Christian-controlled areas in the eastern archepelago… I remember being in a plaza (with the human rights group I was a volunteer at the time) which had just been filled with bodies, where the killers had just plastered an giant image of their sponsor, OBL, on the side of a building. These people had the demonstrated logistics capability and the will to carry out the attacks and they did. The only question is why the shrub administration didn’t do everything they could to try to prevent the attack. Well.. we know the answer to that question: they were too busy playing politics dismantling Clinton’s legacy to bother with national security.


cbl2 | Friday September 11, 2009 07:40 am 89

demi -
woke up with this in my head, discovered this version a few years back
for you my sistah

congratulations on your honors student – oldnslow and I dropped our special needs child off at his college dorm three weeks ago, it can happen


alank | Friday September 11, 2009 07:40 am 90

When the news broke I developed a sinking feeling. I realized almost immediately Cheney/Bush would exploit this quite cynically. And they did.


oldgold | Friday September 11, 2009 07:40 am 91

WASHINGTON – The Coast Guard was conducting a training exercise in the Potomac River moments before President Barack Obama crossed a nearby bridge for a Sept. 11 commemoration.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/us_…..d1YXJkdHI-

How damn stupid are these people? Did they look at the damn calendar?


Blub | Friday September 11, 2009 07:43 am 92
In response to oldgold @ 83

well.. its now official:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/…..038;sub=AR

We accomplished nothing during the entire shrub kakistocracy for America other than accumulate mountains of debt. All gains in income growth, poverty, uninsured, etc, etc… all signs of progress, since before the start of shrub’s reign, have officially been wiped out. shrub’s presidency is now officially the “lost years.”


cbl2 | Friday September 11, 2009 07:43 am 93
In response to bgrothus @ 62

rewarding indeed. has taught us so much about the brain and the mind


Badwater | Friday September 11, 2009 08:03 am 94

…and yet Mountain Dew.

Darrell Issa


diablesseblu | Friday September 11, 2009 08:37 am 95

Had just flown home to NYC on 9/10. Wanted to vote the next day. My desk for many years was in front of a plate glass window that overlooked the WTC. Commuted on the subway to its No. 1 train stop….and my daughter attended nursery/preschool at the iconic Trinity Church. Did my errands on the WTC Concourse and always took visitors for drinks at Windows.

Will never be able to fully comprehend/accept what happened. I lost colleagues, former students, fellow school parents. My then recent college graduate daughter lost acquaintances from her growing up years in NYC. The hardest loss of all was my daughter’s first regular babysitter….an actress and children’s theater director. Laura was moonlighting that morning at a breakfast at the Windows restaurant….like so many who love the city and have to scramble financially to make ends meet. Her elderly parents and only sibling didn’t even know she was there.

I was so shell shocked I walked across the park to keep a hair appointment. Roy and I were the only ones in the salon. When I walked back, jets were screaming low across the length of the park and pulling up. I remember thinking “what/who will we now become?”

Sorry for the ramble. It’s been a tough week emotionally on a lot of levels — and this day always will be.

And BTW, kudos to you Demi.


Crosstimbers | Friday September 11, 2009 09:03 am 96
In response to Blub @ 88

I agree they could do some severe damage, but any comparison between the threat represented by Al Quaida in comparison to those represented by Nazi Germany, the Empire of Japan, or the USSR is a fiction which worked for the Bush administration to maintain fear in support and justification of their actions.


Blub | Friday September 11, 2009 10:51 am 97
In response to Crosstimbers @ 96

oh I agree.. I was just replying to the contention that they are just a bunch of medievalists who couldn’t have plotted and executed 9/11. Clearly they had the capability to do that much if they could get hundreds of boats and organize scores of Madrissahs, smuggle weapons for tens of thousands of troops and deploy them to the Mollucas, all under the supervision of “tall Arabs” (local description) who were seen leading the highly organized town-burnings and carnage.


iremember54 | Saturday September 12, 2009 10:29 pm 98

We can’t bring back the dead from that day, but we can only remember with respect. The sins that day brought will be with us forever. The 4 thousand of our dead in response, and the untold thousands dead in the Countries we invaded for revenge will ever haunt those intelligent to know what we’ve done. Our Country will pay with the debt from all of it, and the disgrace that we should be baring for our actions. The unfixed hole serves to shows the world, that we didn’t care enough to rebuild what was taken from us, as a monument to those lost. We rebuilt the pentagon, that was more important. We are showing the world what we really are by New Orleans, Healthcare, and our letting our crooks get away with almost ruining the worlds economy. We let our people get sick and die, let them lose their homes, savings and investments, jobs, while we bail out the people that caused the problems. We let our congress act like little kids in front of the world, while preaching everyone shopuld be like us. We let our military and intelligence agencies make fools of us, while disgracing the country they are supposed to serve. They all failed us on nine eleven, just like with Pearl Harbor, but yet we still hail them and pay for what they can’t do which is protect us.


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