One Of These Things Is Not Like The Others

Which one of these things is not like the others?

Example #1:

The Illinois governor’s budget proposal would scale back home visits to ill-equipped first-time mothers, who are given advice over 18 months that experts say is repaid many times over in reduced child abuse and better school preparation.

“We spend $1.2 billion a year on child welfare,” said Diana M. Rauner, director of the Ounce of Prevention Fund in Chicago, which channels government money to private agencies. “You’d think we’d spend a lot of money to keep people out of that system.”

Ohio’s proposed budget “will dramatically decrease our ability to investigate reports of abuse and neglect,"…

Example #2:

The $787 billion stimulus act and major spending proposals have ratcheted up the lobbying frenzy further this year, even as President Obama and public-interest groups press for sharper restrictions on the practice.

The paper by three Kansas professors examined the impact of a one-time tax break approved by Congress in 2004 that allowed multinational corporations to "repatriate" profits earned overseas, effectively reducing their tax rate on the money from 35 percent to 5.25 percent. More than 800 companies took advantage of the legislation, saving an estimated $100 billion in the process, according to the study….

…The now-beleaguered financial industry also benefited from the provision, including Citigroup, J.P. Morgan Chase, Morgan Stanley and Merrill Lynch, all of which have since received tens of billions of dollars in federal bailout money.

The researchers calculated an average rate of return of 22,000 percent for those companies that helped lobby for the tax break.

Example #3:

After learning that a camp that connects siblings in foster care would be hit hard by state budget cuts, Tyler Harlow decided to take his bike out for a ride.

This week, the 23-year-old camp counselor will begin what he hopes to be a 55-day journey, logging more than 3,000 miles from Boston to San Francisco to raise $20,000…

Example #4:

Faced with a $3 billion budget deficit, legislators are making cuts that we will all pay for dearly. It runs the gamut, from kids whose education gets shortchanged, to adults struggling with mental-health problems, to thousands of neglected and abused children.

The next time Newt Gingrich opens his yap and whines about the need for more top tier tax cuts, think about example #2 and whose pockets he wants to line…and who gets the shaft. 

And why. 

Do poor, abused children have the money to lobby Congress for humongo benefits, favors and breaks?  Nope.

Why is it that the rest of us foot the bills for this perpetual shortsighted anti-good-government mismanagement and all of its craptastic aftereffects, while corporations get to "repatriate" their profit margins offshore?

Why is it okay to transfer wealth to entities who then shift it to offshore accounts for a legal tax maneuver or to manipulate the corporate bottom line, but odious to even mention any social contract duty to poor, abused and neglected children — something which actually saves public money down the road instead of pouring it down a creative accounting rathole?  Someone explain that one to me, please.

_____________

Prior articles in this child poverty series:  making child poverty a priority;  mortgaging the nation’s future Part I and Part II; better childhood nutrition Part I and Part IIgive kids a head start; bringing poverty to the table Part I and Part II; true compassion; will children be casualties of the stimulus compromise?; and bass-ackwards: who tells at risk children they aren’t worth our effort?.


 
61 Responses to "One Of These Things Is Not Like The Others"
Christy Hardin Smith | Monday April 13, 2009 06:09 am 1

Morning all — who wants some coffee with their jellybean remnants?


sadlyyes | Monday April 13, 2009 06:23 am 2

morninChristy
why do we even have to have this discussion?

children are the future of this country,i had a lunch and egghunt for the neighborhood kids yesterday,we brushed the horsies too….why do republicans want to sabotage
THE FUTURE OF AMERICA


Christy Hardin Smith | Monday April 13, 2009 06:25 am 3
In response to sadlyyes @ 2

The thing that drives me nuts is how much more cost effective — not to mention decent — it is to protect the interests of the most vulnerable in our society up front instead of trying to fix things on the back end when they are already impossibly broken in far too many cases.


Teddy Partridge | Monday April 13, 2009 06:28 am 4
In response to Christy Hardin Smith @ 3

As long as America’s incarceration industry is increasingly privatized and our prevention industry is increasingly dependent upon the kindness of strangers via charity, there is a perverse incentive to ignore the problems that cause trouble down the road — because somebody will make a profit on that trouble.

Morning, Christy, how was your Easter?


Christy Hardin Smith | Monday April 13, 2009 06:30 am 5
In response to Teddy Partridge @ 4

We had a lovely Easter, thanks. The Peanut is off this week for spring break, so she’s watching some Muppet Show this morning while I blog a bit. I’m a mean momma and making her eat some breakfast before she can dive into her Easter candy. *g*


klynn | Monday April 13, 2009 06:30 am 6
In response to Christy Hardin Smith @ 1

We were given some of the Cold Stone Creamery Jelly Belly Beans.

Like a scoop of ice cream in every bean!

Need some coffee!

Gosh, wish I could be honored with a face to face coffee moment with you!

Mr. Klynn took me on a date Friday to hear Amy Goodman. As an early Mother’s Day gift he gave me a signed copy of her book as I met her in person. She loved that the signed book was an early Mother’s Day present because the book is dedicated to her hero, her Mom.

When I got in the car I told him it was a great date. He asked me, ” What could beat that?”

“Only one thing outside of time with you and the kids…coffee with Christy, Marcy and Jane!”

He got it! I’m into heroes who stand up for those who are unable to stand up for themselves, heroes who work to stand up for the rule of law and heroes who are smart, articulate and action-oriented about such issues.


selise | Monday April 13, 2009 06:32 am 7
In response to Christy Hardin Smith @ 3

how much more cost effective — not to mention decent — it is to protect the interests of the most vulnerable in our society up front instead of trying to fix things on the back end

amen!

and why i really despise joe biden for supporting the bankruptcy law changes.

this weekend i listened to a great interview with elizabeth warren from 2007. got me pissed off about that all over again.

anyway, really recommend the interview. warren is inspiring.

http://globetrotter.berkeley.e…..-con0.html


Teddy Partridge | Monday April 13, 2009 06:34 am 8

Christy Hardin Smith | Monday April 13, 2009 06:36 am 9
In response to selise @ 7

Elizabeth Warren has really been on fire lately about so much of this mess, hasn’t she?


JimWhite | Monday April 13, 2009 06:36 am 10

Plenty of money for the child-like behavior on Wall Street but even fewer pennies for the children who really need it. Our system is so messed up these days…

Thanks for your vigilance, Christy.


Christy Hardin Smith | Monday April 13, 2009 06:37 am 11
In response to klynn @ 6

That would be great. I’m hoping to get to Netroots Nation this summer in Pittsburgh if we can configure the family schedule to make it work.


Christy Hardin Smith | Monday April 13, 2009 06:38 am 12

ROFL — The Peanut just fell off her chair laughing at “Piiiiiigs in Spaaaaaaace.” You have to love it when kids rediscover genius from your childhood, don’t you? *G*


Christy Hardin Smith | Monday April 13, 2009 06:40 am 13
In response to JimWhite @ 10

The juxtaposition on all of this really pissed me off, Jim. Where exactly do people like Newt Gingrich think those $100 billion tax breaks get pulled from — if I thought he actually cared, I’d be worried. But he doesn’t.


klynn | Monday April 13, 2009 06:40 am 14

Oh man, I’ll know more by Tuesday PM. I think that is the week of Kindergarten assessments…Let’s hope not. Pittsburgh would be easy to get to.


Leen | Monday April 13, 2009 06:41 am 15

“do poor, abused children have the money to lobby Congress for humongo benefits, favors and breaks?”

Hell these kids can’t even get the same amount of money spent on them as the rich kids in our public schools. One really wonders about just how likely it is for these kids and their families to ever rise out of this fixed system. Grow up in poverty never hear about the possibilities of college, get a job at Wal Mart, barely hang on….this circle of poverty goes round and round here in Appalachia and other parts of the country.

Then the ruling class encourage the blue collar folks to look down the ladder and blame our nations problems on those in poverty instead of looking up the ladder at the folks who own, set the rules and take their $$ and put in in Swiss Banks

Here is how George Carlin explains how the extremely wealthy have rigged the system. The system is rigged
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BXWzSwZ_wPs

Have always imagined filling buses headed to D.C. with folks from Appalachia who are locked in this cycle of poverty to lobby their reps.


Rayne | Monday April 13, 2009 06:43 am 16

Investment.

Conservatives really do not understand investment.

Or perhaps investment isn’t conservative, and that’s why they screw it up.

I will never again listen to a conservative when it comes to investment, because they cannot understand how to invest in sure things, investing instead in things that are little more than a toss of the dice in a rigged game.

Spending more money on HeadStart? Guaranteed winner for a lifetime; fewer adults in 15 years’ time in jail, more young adults who are self-sufficient in that period of time.

Spending more bailout dollars on millionaire bankers’ bonuses? Might as well enter your first poker tournament; it’ll probably cost you less cash and you’ll probably have a funny story to tell years from now. Bankers’ unearned taxpayer-funded bonuses will NOT be funny even 50 years from now.


Christy Hardin Smith | Monday April 13, 2009 06:43 am 17
In response to Teddy Partridge @ 8

Thanks, Teddy — much appreciated.


klynn | Monday April 13, 2009 06:46 am 18

Piigggs Innnnn Spaaaaccce sketches are some of our fave Muppet sketches! Mr. Klynn still has punch lines from them memorized after all these years and works them into conversations with the kids whenever possible!

Darn those pesky chickens from the bird dimension!


Christy Hardin Smith | Monday April 13, 2009 06:46 am 19
In response to Rayne @ 16

Honestly, it seems like such a no-brainer to me to put money into early childhood education programs and child protective services. But maybe that’s because I’ve seen the enormity of the return through the years with a mom who was an elementary school teacher and through my work with at-risk kids.

A little money can have such exponential benefits over the lifetime of the child — for that child, their family and all the rest of us. I look at these kids and think “there but for a whole helluva lot of grace and luck” it could be me or my child.


frandor55 | Monday April 13, 2009 06:46 am 20
In response to Christy Hardin Smith @ 3

The “impossibly broken” become monetized, as in they are now ready for habitation in the prison industrial complex. Throwing “superfluous population” in jail is a good revenue stream for some folks.


selise | Monday April 13, 2009 06:48 am 21
In response to Christy Hardin Smith @ 9

i especially enjoyed warren’s life story (oklahoma, parents remembering the depression), her not-std educational background and later how how she came to understand what our bankruptcy laws can do (it was her research, she started out believing something completely different and thankfully confirmation bias did not stop her from seeing what her data was telling her).


Christy Hardin Smith | Monday April 13, 2009 06:49 am 22
In response to frandor55 @ 20

I think about how much effort I’ve expended on at-risk younger kids and juveniles to get them out of the cycle of violence and despair — and how much just a little care and belief can make such a huge difference for these kids.

Beyond frustrating that there are people who could give a rat’s ass about helping others. Some days…


Leen | Monday April 13, 2009 06:49 am 23
In response to klynn @ 6

Klynn posted a bit about Amy’s stay in Athens over at Oxdown. Amy heard our call and had Art and Peggy Gish on her program broadcast from Woub here at Ohio U.


Christy Hardin Smith | Monday April 13, 2009 06:50 am 24

btw, did everyone else have a good Easter? We spent a lot of our day hiding and re-hiding eggs yesterday. LOL


cbl2 | Monday April 13, 2009 06:52 am 25
In response to JimWhite @ 10

Idolina Moreno, 36,Larry Blankfein 54, and her five children his staff are still together and happier, she he says, because they have been visited weekly for the last several months by a counselor (one Larry Summers) who defused a simmering crisis. One daughter staffer was angry and violent, Ms. Moreno Mr Blankfein said, and badly bruised the infant boy balance sheet; Ms. Moreno Mr Blankfein admits to throwing a plastic bat brickbats to stop her. A school nurse staff attorney called Child Wall Street Protective Services.

Instead of removing the children tax havens, the agency called in a counselor who meets with family members both individually and together. “She’ He’s been wonderful,” Ms. Moreno Mr Blankfein said

“wonderful” indeed


klynn | Monday April 13, 2009 06:55 am 26
In response to Leen @ 23

Yes. Loved your post. Was going to listen to the link later this AM. Thanks so much for posting!

At the Columbus event, Cliff Arnebeck and his legal team (Bronzeville vs Blackwell of the IT specialist Connell vs Rove story) sat in the front row. I have no idea if she was going to interview them.


barbara | Monday April 13, 2009 06:55 am 27
In response to sadlyyes @ 2

Because they are channeling Joe McCarthy via Glenn Beck, intent on scaring the bejeezus out of people about the emerging jackboot, fascist state that hates rich people. Don’t believe me? Just read Digby.

There is zero tolerance for poverty, hunger, social justice or children who have made it out of the uterus in their world.


Christy Hardin Smith | Monday April 13, 2009 06:56 am 28
In response to cbl2 @ 25

Oh — well done!


JimWhite | Monday April 13, 2009 06:58 am 29
In response to cbl2 @ 25

Brilliant!


Christy Hardin Smith | Monday April 13, 2009 06:58 am 30
In response to barbara @ 27

Isn’t it odd how they always turn the thing that is worst about them outward and try to make it the thing that is worst about others in terms of the sales pitch? Rove on a shoestring budget — that’s Glenn Beck’s crapola.


selise | Monday April 13, 2009 06:59 am 31
In response to klynn @ 6

We were given some of the Cold Stone Creamery Jelly Belly Beans.

Like a scoop of ice cream in every bean!

omg. must get some some.

can you recommend where to order from? i didn’t see them on the cold stone creamery site (maybe i just missed it?) and google takes me to lots of shopping sites i dont’ know (and so am leary of using).


Christy Hardin Smith | Monday April 13, 2009 07:01 am 32
In response to selise @ 31

Looks like they are a Jelly Belly concoction.


barbara | Monday April 13, 2009 07:07 am 33

Okay, that was a snarly way for me to start this day, wasn’t it?! Must be coming down from jelly bean high. That and Lindt’s Lindor Truffles. Heavenly!! (The previous unpaid, non-political announcement was brought to you by chocolate allergy woman, who has just discovered the white chocolate version of this product.)


barbara | Monday April 13, 2009 07:09 am 34

Let me ask you something. IYO, how much impact do people like Beck have on the population at large? Well, the Republics, because Dems don’t watch him. Do they believe this sh*t? This is a serious inquiry.


Christy Hardin Smith | Monday April 13, 2009 07:09 am 35
In response to barbara @ 33

We had dinner last night with friends of our who invited us over for a family supper with chosen family friends. It was lovely and we had a great time, but since we all brought some rich dessert with us to share, I’m still on a perpetual sugar buzz from it.

So much for the trying to eat a little better yesterday, I suppose. SIGH


barbara | Monday April 13, 2009 07:12 am 36

Bad day for trying to eat wisely! I think we need to invent something equivalent to Lent (re lifestyle modification) that follows each holiday. National flat belly month! *g*


Christy Hardin Smith | Monday April 13, 2009 07:13 am 37
In response to barbara @ 34

When Beck was on CNN’s Headline News, I would have said not much — because his ratings there were crap and he had no real audience other than the people who already listened to his radio show. Now that he moved to FOX, though? It’s a marriage made in ratings hell because he plugged in to the all ready to buy in goobers who like Hannity and O’Reilly. And I think a large portion of them are the sorts of people who would buy in to his dreck because they already think liburals are out to take their guns, make their wimmenfolk into lezbos and force them to give their paychecks to Cadillac-driving welfare queens.

In short, the Reagan republican dregs — and their buy-in for the likes of Beck’s drool isn’t exactly a stretch, now is it?


cbl2 | Monday April 13, 2009 07:14 am 38

Which one is different . . . do you know ?

from this bit of WaPo fluffery on Emmanuel:

Emanuel brings in all the major groups: the Blue Dog budget hawks, the moderate New Democrats, the politically skittish House freshman class.

where in bloody hell is the Progressive Caucus ?!?! now granted, the access hungry reporter may not deem them “major” – but fyi

it is the largest voting bloc in Congress period

and the one reliable ally our societal safety net has –

President Obama has yet to meet with them


Rayne | Monday April 13, 2009 07:16 am 39

After an accident resulting in a brain injury, my kid brother made a string of really stupid decisions and ended up in prison for a couple of years.

During his time in prison he kept himself busy by tutoring other inmates.

It was an epiphany for him and for our family when he told us not long after he’d been tutoring that he didn’t belong in prison — because he could read.

This realization appeared to snap him out of whatever lingering odd processes came with his brain injury — but it also made us realize that far too many people end up making bad choices because they never acquired basic skills. How many of these people could have had early intervention with the right funding, preventing incarceration? And how many of these people ended up staying in the prison system long after my brother left, graduated from college and eventually got his masters, because they never acquired the basic skills they needed all for the lack of investment in them?

So damned frustrating; it’s the proverb manifest. “Penny wise, pound foolish,” only measured in human suffering and taxpayer dollars.


Leen | Monday April 13, 2009 07:17 am 40
In response to klynn @ 26

Cliff Arnebeck, Wasserman, Fitkaris rip it up. So thankful for everything they have done and continue to do.


barbara | Monday April 13, 2009 07:19 am 41

This is pretty scary, don’t you think? A republic family member works for a major sporting goods chain. He said the day after Obama was elected, gun sales spiked, and have continued running high. (Think “cold, dead hand” mentality.) He totally believes (and may well be right) that the citizens are arming now because they’re sure Obama intends to take their constitutional rights away from them. I would submit that it’s essentially impossible to change that mindset. And so the game that’s afoot is to constantly ignore it, work around it, chip away at it with no noticeable outcome. Drool indeed.


barbara | Monday April 13, 2009 07:21 am 42
In response to cbl2 @ 38

President Obama has yet to meet with them

For real?


barbara | Monday April 13, 2009 07:23 am 43
In response to Rayne @ 39

(((Rayne’s brother))) What an awesome story. Thanks.


cbl2 | Monday April 13, 2009 07:25 am 44
In response to barbara @ 42

klynn | Monday April 13, 2009 07:25 am 45

We were also given the soda collection. So, the kids experimented with making Jelly Belly floats!


klynn | Monday April 13, 2009 07:28 am 46

Btw christy,

Great post. Faced this kind of mentality daily while working in DC. Forgive my “fluff OT” comments…Sometimes the reality of this subject just haunts my mind with the faces of the too many children our organization did outreach to and intervention for…

Intentional digressing I guess.


selise | Monday April 13, 2009 07:29 am 47

i don’t know jelly belly – are they a safe company to order from?

klynn, as far a jelly beans go (i mean, they aren’t dark chocolate *g*) do you recommend them? the ice cream connection sounds awesome.

sorry about the candy and ice cream ot. sounds like great kid candy.


Christy Hardin Smith | Monday April 13, 2009 07:33 am 48
In response to selise @ 47

I don’t know about them in terms of ordering from them online. But Jelly Belly is a pretty popular candy brand, which means that they should be pretty easy to find at the grocery store or a candy store or something.


Leen | Monday April 13, 2009 07:35 am 49

Jelly Belly the best. The name gives it a way


Leen | Monday April 13, 2009 07:41 am 50
In response to Rayne @ 39

thanks
the message is clear your kid brother goes to prison for a “string of really stupid decisions” but those in the Bush administration will never go to prison for far more than a “string” of stupid and disastrous decisions.

the message is very clear for all U.S. citizens as well as folks around the world. There are plenty of people who operate outside of the law and clearly get away with it. That “string” of stupid decisions included the loss of millions of lives. Oh so disgusting


selise | Monday April 13, 2009 07:44 am 51

thanks christy and leen. if it’s a well known candy manufacturer i’ll risk an on line order.


cbl2 | Monday April 13, 2009 07:45 am 52
In response to Rayne @ 39

had no luck trying to find transcript from Ed Schultz/MSNBC of 4/8 – WH Education Budget wherein Ed showed current K-12 Public Education Costs per child in comparison to Incarceration – of course the disparity was staggering

note to firedogs: that was my first glimpse of Education Secretary Duncan – initial impression was he was a good guy – called NCLB ” a national tragedy” – would love to hear resident educators assessment although it may be too early to tell


Rayne | Monday April 13, 2009 07:50 am 53
In response to Leen @ 50

All depends on who it is that has the power to make the public assessment, “This Is A STUPID Decision.”

As long as a rather small percentage of citizens can BUY the ability to tell us what are stupid decisions, they are never going to publicly recognize their own stupid decisions. At some point, we as the government are going to have to tell them the truth and then demand some karmic compensation for the stupid decisions.


cbl2 | Monday April 13, 2009 07:58 am 54

o/t

fyi - Selise - in the unlikely event you hadn’t seen this

…Rep. Carolyn Maloney, chair of the Joint Economic Committee.

Her next hearing, scheduled for Tuesday, is must-viewing. It will feature Nobel Laureate Joseph Stiglitz; former IMF chief economist Simon Johnson, whose recent piece in the Atlantic Monthly compared the US to third-world kleptocracies, and Thomas Hoenig, the most outspokenly critical of the regional Federal Reserve Bank presidents.


Blub | Monday April 13, 2009 08:07 am 55

IL governor’s budget (referenced in the post)?

Is this something the new governor just produced or is it a Blago leftover?


selise | Monday April 13, 2009 08:09 am 56
In response to cbl2 @ 54

thanks! again!

i hadn’t seen that one – have actually been debating with myself about whether or not to do more of the hearings lists. the frank/dodd hearings have sucked so very badly, i’d rather spend my time calling for real investigative hearings instead of the stupid kabuki they’ve been orchestrating.

i’m always up for more more stiglitz. that one should be interesting. not long ago simon johnson and lori wallach testified together and i thought my head would explode (unrepentant ex-imfer and public citizen global trade watch together trying to get idiotic congress members to face reality? yikes! i though hell was going to freeze over).

you’ve got me looking forward to a hearing now….


Synoia | Monday April 13, 2009 08:21 am 57

“Why is it okay to transfer wealth to entities …odious to even mention any social contract duty to poor, abused and neglected children.

Someone explain that one to me, please.”

Becuase there is no limit to greed. No comprehension of common good, and of lawabidingness, not a trace.

It is the anthesis of Christianity, and the moneychangers have bought the temple.


klynn | Monday April 13, 2009 08:51 am 58
In response to selise @ 47

Highly recommended (although, Reagan loved them).

They have a factory outlet store where they sell the not-so-perfectly shaped beans called Belly Flops!


selise | Monday April 13, 2009 08:54 am 59
In response to klynn @ 58

thanks! any other flavor suggestions would be very welcome.


earlofhuntingdon | Monday April 13, 2009 09:12 am 60

It’s a virtual war zone, where guns are legislation, bullets are rules and subsidies and bent members of the judiciary, like the clown that tried Gov. Don Siegelman in Alabama. The soldiers fallen like corn, row upon row, atop the parapets are you and me and our families.

Congress is the shifty potential ally, with the men and material to change the game. It could promote the interests of those who vote for its members. Or it can continue to do what’s doing now: promote the interests of those who pay their elections and demand in exchange rules and subsidies whose value is orders of magnitude greater than the money exchanged.

It’s a war of attrition in which each side keeps doing what it’s always done, and is getting what it always got. Perhaps blogs can help revise the strategy so that a losing stalemate becomes a war of movement and opportunity.


earlofhuntingdon | Monday April 13, 2009 09:22 am 61

Case in point: Banks Move to Oppose Change in Student Lending.

The banksters don’t want the government to use its scarce resources more wisely and reduce the cost of delivering legislated student loans to students. They like the cushy income, the captive market brought in young, and the potential default rates of interest and penalty fees. They don’t want the government to pay out less in fees to them, or more in loans to more students if it means they get a smaller piece of a shrinking pie.

Like the Republican Party and those dates you’re well rid of, it’s all about them. The banksters don’t even pretend to argue that they provide a more efficient way to spend tax dollars. They just want their money. To hell the with the students and their loans, and the personal and American futures they would help build.

Also like the Republican Party, such obvious, ruthless, destructive selfishness should be met with a calm reply: “Thanks for the advice, but here’s how we’re gonna do it.”


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